Three themes characterised the strong contribution made by the Institute in 2017–18: Impact, Innovation and Partnerships. We secured a new five-year funding agreement with the NSW Government, attracted a new $2.5 million grant from the National Health and Medical Research Council to improve the lives of Aboriginal children, and marked the first collections of biosamples that will allow our renowned 45 and Up Study to answer entirely new questions about healthy ageing.

2017–18 Annual Report

“This has been a year of transformation for the Sax Institute, as we continue putting the building blocks in place to deliver on our strategic goals.” – Dr Irene Moss, Chair.

Three themes characterised the strong contribution made by the Institute in 2017–18: Impact, Innovation and Partnerships. We secured a new five-year funding agreement with the NSW Government, attracted a new $2.5 million grant from the National Health and Medical Research Council to improve the lives of Aboriginal children, and marked the first collections of biosamples that will allow our renowned 45 and Up Study to answer entirely new questions about healthy ageing.

The Australian Prevention Partnership Centre, which is administered by the Sax Institute, also concluded its first five years of operations and has embarked on a second five-year phase focused on scale-up, after winning renewed support from a range of funding partners.

Other highlights of 2017–18:

  • The 45 and Up Study embarked on its ‘third wave’ of data collection, which occurs every five years and enhanced in this wave by the addition of a range of new questions
  • The Institute’s expertise in evaluation is contributing to program and service delivery improvements nationwide; more than 250 reviews have been commissioned by policy agencies through our Evidence Check program since it was set up in 2006
  • The Institute leveraged its growing reach and national and international partnerships to stage a landmark conference on knowledge mobilisation in mid-2018, headlined by some of the world’s top thinkers in the translation of health research into policy and practice
  • The Study of Environment on Aboriginal Resilience and Child Health (SEARCH) has continued to achieve greater recognition, being praised by the Minister for Indigenous Health as a ‘jewel in the crown’ of the Aboriginal health research landscape
  • The Institute’s Secure Unified Research Environment (SURE) achieved ISO 27001 accreditation and completed an Australian Government-recognised IRAP assessment, signifying its robust data security arrangements.

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